Ann Wynn Laningham

A native of Lee county, she was the daughter of John C. and Henrietta (Browning) Wynn of Jonesville.  She was a person of many talents and tireless energy.

Ann Laninghan

A native of Lee county, she was the daughter of John C. and Henrietta (Browning) Wynn of Jonesville.  She was a person of many talents and tireless energy.  The writer first remembers her as a piano teacher and director of school musical programs at Stickleyville School about 1912, prior to her marriage to James E. Laningham.

Even though they reared four children, her long life has been of endless activity, but she was best known as the first regent of the Lovelady Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution, a life member and Lee County Director of the Historical Society of Southwest Virginia, and co-author of “Early Settlers of Lee County,” along with Mrs. Hattie (Muncy) Bates.

She was past president of the Lee county Garden Club, member of the Eastern Star Powell Valley Chapter #13, an active member of the First United Methodist Church and Methodist Women’s Circle, Homemakers Club, and was the principal organizer of the first Pennington Gap High School Band in the early 1930’s.

Mrs. Ann Wynn Laningham died on Thursday, September 3, 1987 at her home in Pennington Gap, Va., at age 96.  Funeral services were conducted at the Firs Methodist Church in Pennington Gap by her pastor on Sunday, September 6, 1987.  Interment was in the Memorial Garden at Woodway, Lee County, Virginia.

Mrs Laningham  is survived by the following children: John W. Laningham, Jonesville, Va.; Col. Wm. B. Laningham, of Orlando, Fla.; and twins Mary Ann and James E. Laningham of North Carolina.  She was proceeded in death by her husband and a grandson, John W. Laningham, Jr.

Survivors from her family also include two brothers: Browning Wynn of Jonesville, and Richard Wynn of Knoxville.  Two sisters, Mrs. Mary Wynn Hall of Dayton, Ohio, and Mrs. Jim Wynn Litton of Jonesville, Va., and four grandsons, one granddaughter, three great-grandsons, and one great-granddaughter.

By: Mrs. Bonnie Ball

From: Historical Sketches of Southwest Virginia, Publication No. 21 – 1987

The Red Fox Trail

The Red Fox Trail near Pound, Virginia where a massacre took place.

If you would like to read more about the story of Doc Taylor, “The Red Fox of the Cumberland” and the Massacre of  Pound  Gap, you will find it in Charles A. Johnson’s book,[intlink id=”8″ type=”page”]WISE COUNTY VIRGINIA[/intlink].  You will find it in  the Bookstore on this site or visit Wise County Historical Society Office and Bookstore at the Courthouse in Wise.

Killing Rock In Pound, VA

Hiking the trail

Taking A Breather

Railroad Station Site

Shortcuts up the Mountain

Drinking from the Stream

Site of Ambush

Pausing for Thought

Places to visit in Wise County

Places of Interest to Visit In Wise County

The Inn at Wise

APPALACHIA, VIRGINIA

Appalachia: Food, Churches, Schools, Shops.

Roaring Branch: Near Appalachia, VA

Bee Rock Tunnel-Worlds second shortest railroad tunnell beside the beautiful Powell River

[intlink id=”353″ type=”page”]Coal/Railroad Days-[/intlink]August  (event)

Lewis E. Henegar Miners Memorial park: Callahan Avenue in Appalachia – Open Park with old mining machinery

The Peake Building: Main Street, Appalachia, VA (Guinness Book of Records)

101 Presidential Car: Railroad car from the South Carolina & Georgia Railroad, representative of passenger cars from the late 1800’s. Open Tues-Fri, 10am-5pm; May-Oct., Mon-Sat., 10am-5pm; Sun, 1-5pm.

BIG STONE GAP, VIRGINIA

  • Big Stone Gap: Hotels-Food-Services, Gifts, Hospitals, schools and Churches
  • Appalachian Day- October – Bullitt Park
  • Duff Acadamy: Duff Family Private School
  • June Tolliver House: Clinton, Avenue – Restored house,Gifts, Area Crafts and
  • John Fox Jr.  Museum – East Shawnee Avenue Preserved home of famous author.
  • Meador Coal Museum: See how coal was mined here for the last 100 years
  • Mountain Empire Community College: mountain crafts, food, music and more (event)
  • Dotson Park
  • Southwest Virginia Museum-First Street-Exhibits depict heritage of Southwest Virginia.
  • “Trail of the Lonesome Pine” Clinton Avenue – Oldest outdoor drama in Virginia
  • [intlink id=”353″ type=”page”]Home Crafts Day:  [/intlink]October at Mountain Empire Community College
COEBURN, VIRGINIA
  • Coeburn: Churches, food, schools-craft shops, shopping center
  • Flatwoods Job Corps
  • Flatwoods Picnic Area
  • Guest River Rally: Labor Day Weekend-music, crafts, food
  • [intlink id=”1343″ type=”post”]Guest River Gorge Trail:[/intlink] A trail made from an old railroad bed. Gorgeous scenery
  • Lay’s Hardware Building: Old Time Music, Flat-footing/Clogging  every Friday Night
  • Old Tacoma School and Community Center: – Blue Grass Music and Dancing- Friday Nigh
  • Ramsey-Flea Market: (Wednesdays) Long running flea market that started out as a stock – market, marketing cattle.
  • (This flea market has now discontinued after more than 50 years.)
  • Lonesome Pine International Raceway
  • Shopping Center

POUND, VIRGINIA

Food, Motels, Churches, Schools

ST. PAUL, VIRGINIA

Saint Paul-Food, Churches, Schools, Shopping

  • Ox Bow Lake
  • Sugar Hill Loop Trail
  • Guests River

NORTON,VIRGINIA

Norton: Hotels, Food, Churches, Schools, Shops, Hospitals

WISE, VIRGINIA

Diseases and Epidemics in Wise County : 1856 -1894

Listed below is a list of diseases and epidemics in Wise County from 1856 when the county was formed through 1894. The infant mortality rate was enormous. Notice the many infant and children’s deaths in comparison to adults.

Diseases and Epidemics in Wise County

1856 -1894

Causes of deaths
As recorded in Wise County Death Records
Fannie Lane Steele

Listed below is a list of diseases and epidemics in Wise County from 1856 when the county was formed through 1894. The infant mortality rate was enormous. Notice the many infant and children’s deaths in comparison to adults.

In 1856 there were 28 entries of which 19 were children under the age of 12 years old

In 1857, 28 were infants and children and 9 were above the age of 12 years.

In 1864-1866 there were 38 entries of which 22 were infants and children. Many were babies who only lived a few days, hours or months.

In 1867-1869 seventy deaths were listed of which 41 were children

1870-1874 there were 76 entries of which 36 were children

1876-1879 there were 108 entries of which 35 were children

1880-1883 there were 106 entries listed and 50 of them were children

1884 there was 108 entries listed of which 65 of them were children and 73 of the 108 died of the flux.

1885 – 74 listed of which 40 were children under 12 years old.

1886 – 37 listed of which 21 were children

There were very few who lived to be the age of 90 or older. Note the simple and repetitive causes of death such as “fever,” “Old age,” “Hives, ” “Fits,” “Child Bed Fever” and “Croup.” Other causes of death were stated as: “Killed by a horse,” or “Killed by a tree,” “Falling off Train,” “burn,” “drowned,” or simply “shot.”

There were numerous causes listed as simply “Unknown.” This makes us realize how far medicine has progressed. The causes of death listed below does not represent every death during the years listed. I only listed the causes of death for each year as there was numerous repetitions of the same cause of death such as “flux,” in the year of 1884.

From the time our county was formed in 1856 the disease of “Consumption” was rampant, which I understand is “Tuberculosis.” In 1884 there was an epidemic of the disease called “Flux” which was a stomach or bowel disorder. In 1917 the influenza “Flu” epidemic was everywhere including Wise and surrounding counties.

Notice the strange names such as “Bealing,” “Erysipelas,” “Gravel,” “Hydrassal,” “Infantum,” “LaGripp,” “Putrid,” “Torpid,” “Scrofula”

What is the difference in “Hives” and “Bold Hives?”

1856

  • Hives
  • Bold hives
  • Consumption (Tuberculosis)
  • Killed in a fracus (fracas)
  • Burns
  • Croop (croup)
  • Old age
  • Child bed (fever)
  • Killed by a horse
  • Tipos (typhus) fever (Typhoid?)
  • Not known
  • Fits
  • Dropsy
  • Croops (croup)
  • Hives

1857

  • Flux
  • Unknown
  • Pleurisy
  • Scarlet Fever
  • Palsy
  • Fits
  • Dropsey (dropsy)
  • Crushed by log

1858

  • Hives
  • Flux
  • Burned
  • Consumption
  • Fever
  • Croop (croup)
  • Unknown

1859

  • Unknown
  • Croup
  • Scrofula
  • Fever
  • Quinsy
  • Whooping Cough
  • Dropsy
  • Liver Complaint
  • Eating Dirt
  • Child Baring (bearing)

1860

  • Croop (croup)
  • Unknown
  • Phthis(?)
  • Burn
  • Whooping Cough
  • Ulcer
  • Hives
  • Colera (cholera)
  • Palsey (palsy)
  • Killed
  • Quinsy
  • Palsy
  • Liver
  • Gravel
  • Rhematism (rheumatism)

1861

  • Measles
  • Consumption
  • Croup
  • Unknown
  • Croup
  • Fever
  • Hives
  • Stillborn
  • Colaymorbes
  • Disease of head
  • 1864-1866
  • In Child bearing
  • Unknown
  • Erysipelas
  • Dropsy
  • Fever
  • Diarrhea
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Hives
  • Burn
  • Flux
  • Shot
  • Croup
  • Childbirth
  • St Antnies fire
  • Cancer
  • Consumption

1867-1869

  • Fever
  • Croup
  • Inflammation
  • Bleeding
  • Consumption
  • Old age
  • Unknown
  • Disease ??
  • Hives
  • Kidney Disease
  • Typhoid
  • Shot
  • Lung Fever
  • Irecepilas
  • Rheumatism
  • Cholera
  • Irrecep
  • Burn
  • Erecylipus
  • Change of life
  • Killed
  • Cold
  • Hives
  • Dropsy

1870-1874

  • Bold Hives
  • Unknown
  • Old Age
  • Fever
  • Smothered
  • Drowned
  • Diphtheria
  • Still born
  • Consumption
  • Whooping Cough
  • Cramp
  • Poisoned
  • Tumor on arm
  • Fulex
  • Hives
  • Dyspepia (dyspepsia)
  • Dyspepsia
  • Kidney Disease
  • White Swelling
  • Thrash
  • Croup
  • Breast disease
  • Dropsy

1876-1879

  • Bold Hives
  • Consumption
  • Diphtheria
  • Hooping Cough (Whooping Cough)
  • Neumonia (Pneumonia)
  • Old Age
  • Palpitations
  • Unknown
  • Fever
  • Burned
  • Dropsy
  • Shot
  • Unknown
  • Drowned

1880-1883

  • Fits
  • Shot/Dr. Howell
  • Dyspepsia
  • Unknown
  • Consumption
  • Infla. bowels
  • Coroup (Croup)
  • Piles
  • Fever
  • Heart Disease
  • Dropsey (dropsy)
  • Heart Disease
  • Diphtheria
  • Scrofula
  • Cramp
  • Lung Disease
  • Bronchitis
  • Brain Fever
  • Hives
  • Burn
  • Palsy
  • Old Age
  • Unknown
  • Ulcer

1884

  • Flux
  • Fever
  • Swallowed Fish bone
  • Liver Disease
  • Inflam..stomach (Inflamed)
  • Pneumonia Feaver (fever)
  • Chollera (cholera)
  • Consumption
  • Croup
  • Canser (cancer)
  • Cold
  • Lung Fever
  • Unknown
  • Dipthery (Diphtheria)
  • Old Age
  • Spinal Affection (Infection)
  • Child Bed Fever
  • Hart (Heart) Disease
  • Brain Fever
  • Inflammation Brain
  • Dead Born
  • Dropsy
  • Ulser (ulcer)
  • Cramp
  • Accidently (accidentaly) killed by a tree
  • Scrofula

1885

  • Bole Hives
  • Hooping Cough (Whooping Cough)
  • Spinal Affection (infection)
  • Bealing of Stomach
  • Fits
  • Hemorrhaging
  • Flux
  • Fits
  • Pneumonia Fever
  • Bold Hives
  • Euresipullas (Erysipelas)
  • Disease of Kidneys
  • Cancer
  • Unknown
  • Brain fever
  • Consumption
  • Scarlet Fever
  • Croup
  • Canser (cancer)
  • Accidental Shot
  • Bold Hives
  • Dropsey (dropsy)
  • Burnt to death
  • Bronchitus (bronchitis)
  • Heart Disease

1886-1887

  • Disease of liver
  • Measels (measles)
  • Flux
  • Brain Fever
  • Yellow Janders (Jaundice)
  • Fever
  • Consumption
  • Inflammatory rheumatism
  • Diseased lungs
  • Croup
  • Unknown
  • Diptheria (diphtheria)
  • Infermation (Inflammation)
  • Bold Hives
  • Hives
  • Falling off Train
  • Scrofula
  • Burn
  • Hooping (whooping) Cough
  • Heart Disease
  • Diptheria (diphtheria)
  • Putrid Sore Throat
  • Crooked limbs
  • Bold hives
  • Fevor (fever)
  • Not known
  • Dipthery (diphtheria)
  • Not listed
  • Cholerra (cholera) Infantum
  • Flux
  • Measels (measles)
  • Inflation of Brain
  • Croup
  • Consumption
  • Rupture In Side
  • Dropsy
  • Hives
  • Childbed fever
  • Child Bearing
  • Unknown
  • Croup and Bold Hives
  • Lung Disease
  • Hooping (whooping) Cough
  • Enlargement of Bowels
  • Hydrassal
  • Bone Eresephlis (erysipelas)

1888

  • Infermation (Inflammation ) of Brain
  • Nerve Fever
  • Asthma
  • Consumption
  • Not known
  • Croup
  • Paralysis
  • Hives
  • Dropsey (dropsy)
  • Shot
  • Hooping Cough (whooping cough)
  • Infermation (Inflammation) of stomach
  • Rodeolo
  • Not Known
  • Heart Disease
  • Measles
  • Whooping Cough
  • Erechyalas (erysipelas)
  • Brain Fever
  • Fever
  • Dipthera (diphtheria)

1889

  • Yellow Jaundice
  • Not Known
  • Fever
  • Spinal Affection
  • Consumption
  • Bold Hives
  • Brain Fever
  • Old Age
  • Dysenterria (dysentery)
  • Diptherie (diphtheria)
  • Flux
  • Paralysis
  • Murdered
  • Rupture on the Brain
  • Lagrippe
  • Dropsey (dropsy)
  • Suicide
  • Killed
  • Rheumatism of the head
  • Killed Accidentley (accidentally)
  • Crop (croup?)
  • Rheumatism of head
  • Liver Diseas (disease)
  • Paralysis
  • Typhoid Fever
  • Cholery (Cholera) Infantim
  • Fits
  • Pneumonia Fever
  • Died at Birth
  • Hives
  • Inflamation (Inflammation)
  • Membramers (Membranous) Croup
  • Sore Throat
  • Diptheria (diphtheria)
  • Burn
  • Billious Fever
  • Inflamation (Inflammation) Bladder
  • Paralysis

1890

  • Consumption
  • Fever
  • Hives
  • Yellow Jaundice
  • Dysentery
  • Croup
  • Hooping Cough (whooping)
  • Drowned
  • Notriceran (?) (Nutrician?)
  • Dysentry (Dysentery)
  • Jarpron
  • Dysentary
  • Old age
  • Typhoid Fever
  • Not known
  • Paralyisis (Paralysis)
  • Dyspepsia
  • Indigestion
  • Bold Hives
  • Brain Fever
  • Drowned
  • Measels (measles)
  • Murdered
  • Dropsey (dropsy)

1891

  • Bold hives
  • Dropsey (dropsy)
  • Catarrah of Head (catarrhal)
  • Lagripe
  • Parralisis (paralysis)
  • Consumption
  • Fever
  • Not Known
  • Ulcer
  • Not listed
  • Pregnant condition
  • Fever or Lagripp (Lagrippe)
  • Croup
  • Heart Diseas (disease)
  • Shot
  • Murdered
  • Relaps on Measels (relapse)
  • Burnt to death
  • Rupture
  • Shot
  • Congestion of Brain
  • Yellow Jaundice
  • Liver Diseas
  • Pluracy (pleurisy)
  • Measels (measles)
  • Shot
  • Paralysis
  • Dipthery (diphtheria)
  • Brain trouble
  • Torpid Liver
  • Killed by Train
  • Dropsy & Fever
  • Poisoned
  • Old Age
  • Croup
  • Famer (?) (Fever) ?
  • Lagrippe
  • Measles
  • By fire
  • Killed by Blast
  • Collery Infantum (cholera)
  • Hives
  • Cholliera Infantum (cholera)
  • Scroffula (scrofula)
  • Not known
  • Erresipalis (Erysipelas)
  • Worms
  • Hives
  • Lagrippe
  • Drowned
  • Neuralgia

1892

  • Torpid Liver
  • Killed by a falling tree
  • Shot
  • Not known
  • Measles
  • Old age
  • Typhoid Fever
  • Flux
  • Murdered
  • Bold Hives
  • Fever
  • Hives
  • Consumption
  • Murdered
  • Thrash
  • Spinel (spinal) Affection (Infection?)
  • Iritation of Stomach (Irritation)
  • Heart Failier (failure)
  • Hurt with a tape(?)
  • Dropsey (dropsy)
  • Heart Diseas (disease)
  • Not Known one hand?
  • Rheumatism
  • Croup
  • Herat (Heart) dropsey
  • Lagrippa (lagrippe)
  • Acidently (accidentally) Shot
  • Skin Disease
  • Gravel
  • Margetis (meningitis)
  • Killed in Coal Mines
  • Cancer
  • Lagrip (Lagrippe)
  • Scrofula
  • Liver Diseas disease)
  • Rheumatiom (rheumatism)
  • Worms
  • Asthma
  • Shot
  • Suicide
  • Bronchitis

1893

  • Hives
  • Not known
  • Killed by Falling
  • Indijestion (indigestion)
  • Fever
  • Absess of Bowels (abscess)
  • Killed y RR Train
  • Dipthera (diphtheria)
  • Dropsey (dropsy)
  • Consumption
  • Croup
  • Abcess (abscess) of Bowels
  • Diarea (diarrhea)
  • Fell Down Stares
  • Scrofulus (scrofulous)
  • Spinal Menjitis (meningitis)
  • Cholra Morbus (Cholera morbus )
  • Flux
  • Cramp Colic
  • Rheumatism
  • Childbed Fever
  • Liver Diseas (disease)
  • Diarrehorea (diarrhea)
  • Died from a fall
  • Cold
  • Gravel
  • Diarrhea
  • Bronchitus (bronchitis)
  • Paralysis
  • Bold Hives
  • Heart Disease
  • Spinel Mengetis (spinal meningitis)
  • Spinel Disease (spinal)
  • Lagrippe
  • Burned
  • Burnt
  • Exposier (exposure)
  • Lagripp
  • Paralissis (paralysis)

1894

  • Not Known
  • Scarlet Fever
  • Spinal Mengitis (meningitis)
  • Hooping (whooping) cough
  • Killed Accidintly (accidentally)
  • Side Pluracy (pleurisy)
  • Typhoid Fever
  • Lung Disease
  • Whooping Cough
  • Rheumatism
  • Consumption
  • Spinal Mengitis (meningitis)
  • Croup
  • Burnt to Death
  • Side Pluracy (pleurisy)
  • Paralissis (pleurisy)
  • Rheumatism
  • Hemorhage (hemorrhage) of womb
  • Dropsey (dropsy)
  • Spinal Affection
  • Whooping Cough
  • Typhoid Fever
  • Spinal Menegitis (meningitis)
  • Bold Hives
  • Fell – accidently Killed (accidentally)
  • Ulcer of Bowels
  • Scrofula
  • Paralisis (paralysis)
  • Lagripp
  • Fever
  • Not known
  • Hives
  • Brain Fever
  • Hooping (whooping) cough
  • Erecipelas (erysipelas)
  • Cole (cold)
  • Flux

The Appalachian Quarterly

Qua-Dec2003.JPG (653259 bytes)

Special Focus:June Carter Cash – Compiled by members of WCHS

Tribute: Ruth Kilgore Hamilton by Rhonda Robertson

Regular Features: Aging-Marie Olinger Davis – by Dorothy H. WittUncle Dan Richmond – by  David Chaltas & Richard G. BrownW. VA Unclaimed Civil War Medals Tell us a Big Tale – By Kathleen TaylorDescendants of WM. Vicars – by Dawna VicarsJohn  Counts of Glade Hollow-  By E.J Sutherland Tazewell Co. Marriage Register 1800-1853 – by Rhonda RobertsonFirsts for Wise County Historical Society: Wedding Legend of the Baker Estate – by Fred H. LawsonCommemorative-Carter SignName and Family of Dotson by Emory L. HamiltonHylton Family Heritage by James F. Carver

 

Melungeons

Melungeon Movement In the Past Decade – by Jim Callahan

American Indian Melungeon Book By Karlton Douglas

Wikipedia Definations of Melungeon-ness

National Melungeon Registry

The Uncertainty of Melungeons – by Karlton Douglas

Dictionary of Genealogy and Archaic Terms – by Dick Eastman

 

On The Bookshelf – Fannie Lane Steele

 

APPALACHIAN QUARTERLY

Dec02.jpg (398166 bytes)Special Focus

Bad Talt Hall by Nancy C. Brown

Features

Letters from the Battlefield by Greg Lepore

Shoot-out at Martin Train Depot by Bob Hall

The Whitakers by David C. Whitaker

Descendants of William Vicars by Dawna J. Vicars

The Saga of Bad John Hall by Bob Hall

Benjamin Harrison 1750-1808 by Jeremy F. Elliott

Mystery of the Young Soldiers by Willis Sexton

Aging Gracefully – Emily Qualls by Dorothy Witt & Wanda Rose

Correction by Benjamin F. Luntz

Wise County Marriage Books by William C. Gobble

 

 

 

Melungeon

Pike County Kentucky Marriages by Patricia H. Baldwin

New Columnist by P.H. Baldwin

Mixing It Up by Karlton Douglas

Melungeons and Myth by George R. Gibson

Update–What is Melungeon by Dr. N. Brent Kennedy

On The Bookshelf by Fannie Lane Steele

Calendar: Events of the area

Rita Kennedy Sutton

Rita Elizabeth (Kennedy) Sutton was born March 13, 1906 in the community of Imboden, near Appalachia, Virginia. Later, her name was changed to Rita Jo, for a favorite character in “Little Women.” The daughter of Benjamin F. and Rosa R. Kennedy, she spent most of her life in Dickenson county. She was an avid reader and brilliant scholar. 

Rita Kennedy Sutton

By Mrs. Bonnie S. Ball

Rita Elizabeth (Kennedy) Sutton was born March 13, 1906 in the community of Imboden, near Appalachia, Virginia.  Later, her name was changed to Rita Jo, for a favorite character in “Little Women.”

The daughter of Benjamin F. and Rosa R. Kennedy, she spent most of her life in Dickenson county.  She was an avid reader and brilliant scholar.  The family moved to Clintwood where she attended high school.

At age 17 she entered Martha Washington College, and at age 19 she returned to Dickenson County, where she taught English, French, and History in the junior high school near Fremont and McClure.

On September 2, 1928 she was married to John I. Sutton, a banker from Abingdon.  She later attended William and Mary College, and moved to Abingdon.  The following Spring they moved to Clintwood, where her husband opened the first Piggly Wiggly store.

Their daughter, Eliza Rose (Mrs. Kent Rigg), was born in 1929.  At the age of 24, Rita Kennedy Sutton was suddenly stricken by polio, after which she went to an Abingdon hospital for six months.  Eventually a vaccine was developed that cleared the infection.  After two months she went to Warm Springs, Georgia for treatment periodically.

In August , 1932 the Kennedy family moved to Wise.  Although Rita’s body grew weaker, her will grew stronger,”  She later became Advertising Manager for the Piggly Wiggly grocery chain, and became interested in genealogy, having published “Early Osbornes & Alleys,” “Early Carters in Scott Cunty, Va.”, and “Kennedy’s Piggly Wiggly Stores, Inc.: A Backward Glance.”

Quotation from a biographical sketch by Catherine C. Riggs, In The Coalfield Progress.

Mrs. Sutton was a founding member of the Wise Study Club, a woman’s group that remains true to its early motto, “Tis the mind that makes the body rich.”  Mrs. Sutton was an honorary life member of the Southwest Virginia Historical Society.

According to her granddaughter, Catherine C. Riggs, she became a published author at the age of 71.  She taught herself to type at 67.  In 57 years she was unable to walk, but never complained.  She passed away on November 20, 1987.

What a marvelous woman!

From: Historical Sketches of Southwest Virginia – Publication No. 22 – 1

Home Crafts Day

Mountain Empire Community College

Big Stone Gap, Virginia

Each Year in October, HOME CRAFT’S DAY is held at Mountain Empire Community College where people can bring their crafts to show and sell.

There is Apple butter making, Corn grinding, Wood work of many kinds, and various crafts where people show their magnificent handiwork of the mountains. Lots of Vendors, Music, Food and Fun.

scan0014Highway near MECC

Home_Crafts_DayTents

apple.peelersApple Peeler’s

Apple_CiderApple Cider

grinding.cornGrinding Corn

Corn.mealCorn Meal

grindstoneGrind Stone

work.benchWork Bench

workbenchWork Benches

Corn.mealBench/old Irons

Fannie__NinaFannie Steele & Nina Mullins

Nina__WandaNina Mullins & Wanda Rose

wpe1Ganell Marshall and her corn-shuck dolls